multiliteracyrevolution

Archive for the ‘What is Multiliteracy?’ Category

DMLcentral Resource / Beyond The New London Group

Posted by nicholaspelafas on August 26, 2011

The more time I spend on the web exploring this field, the more encouraged I am at the number of people thinking and writing about new literacies.  The field of multiliteracies is in the midst of a transformation that is pulling the discussion closer to our contemporary reality and beyond the original work of the New London Group published 15 years ago (which is eons in techno-time).  In the multiliteracy blogosphere as of late there is an increasingly popular trend to explore the linkages between education, civic participation, and multiliteracies.  It seems educators are simultaneously becoming more aware of the natural participatory potentiality of multiliteracies and the necessity of education to embrace widely used new medias.  This type of thinking comes from the conviction of many young teachers/students these days, namely that education must be the central tenant in the movement to realize social transformation and a civic re-imagining.

A great example of one of these web resources is DML central (dmlcentral.net), which stands for digital media and learning.  DML central is the online forum  for the Digital Media and Learning Research Hub located at the systemwide University of California Humanities Research Institute.  It is similar to what we were envisioning for this blog, but with much more funding and institutional direction – which is certainly a credit to what you can accomplish without those two things.  DML is a space where we can consciously consider the role of digital media in our society, and how we can best understand it and influence its usage via education.  While clearly digital interconnectivity is only part of the picture when it comes to transforming society and truly reforming education, DML ties it to praxis, stating its mission as wanting “to enable break-through collaborations and evoke illuminating conversations that lead to innovations in learning and public participation.”   Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Critical Perspectives, In the Classroom, Resources, Technology, The Arts, What is Multiliteracy? | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Multiliteracy defined pt. 2

Posted by nicholaspelafas on August 9, 2011

In the 2010 article by Dr. Carol Westby entitled, Multiliteracies: The Changing World of Communication, she offers a very straight forward look at how the scholarship is defining multiliteracies in 2010.  It provides a very good basic overview of the topic, and definently contributes to the growing lexicon surrounding multiliteracies.

The purpose of this article is to elaborate on the aspect of ‘multi-modal ways of making meaning’ as identified by the New London Group in their 1996 report A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies: Designing Social Futures, and to ‘explain the implications of this aspect of multiliteracies for [Speech Language Pathologists] and educators.’  The author gives examples of what some of todays multiliteracy-dependent media looks like, and expounds on its relationship to the skill identified by the New London Group called design (which in turn has three aspects: available designs, designing, and redesigned).   The author also gives educators and SLPs guidance on how they can promote multiliteracies in the classroom.

The article finishes with a short but interesting section on targeting multiliteracy skills for children with language disorders.  In this section she explores the idea of creating a Multiliteracy Map as developed by Dr. Susan Hill, who completed the report Mapping multiliteracies: Children of the new millennium, a project funded by the Australian Research Council investigating the use of new literacies by children aged 4-8 years.  She concludes by summarizing what is important about multiliteracies.  The article is worth a read, especially for students unfamiliar with the topic, as a basic introduction to multiliteracies.

Posted in In the Classroom, Resources, What is Multiliteracy? | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Administration=Education

Posted by serovy1 on August 7, 2011

This is a post is a rant about the connection between administration and the quality of education.It could be argued that administrators “speak their own language in a sense, meaning, each has his or her own way of handling tasks and implementing new strategies for procedures which ultimately direct and dictate a student’s path. What I have come to find as a teacher, however is that administrative staff need to also be open to learning the language of their schools. It is infinitely important that an administrative officer immerse themselves into the culture of the school and try to work as a team along with fellow colleagues, students and staff. If this doesn’t happen, it creates a real distance between everyone. Students don’t get what they need, and teachers become frustrated with the lack of understanding in terms of how documentation and facility strategies form in conjunction with the demands of students and their learning objectives.The bottom line is that in order to solve this problem, everyone needs to communicate. More collaboration between staff means less referrals, more direct answers for students and less objections to new policies,since everyone’s needs would be considered. One way for this to happen is an increase in faculty meetings and discussion, but when daily tasks are so maxed to begin with, that may not always be possible. Thus, the potential for technology to aid in this communication between staff, teachers and students is huge. Online databases and social networking can open portals for schools that would help keep everyone informed, while offering an anonymous, open space for voicing opinions, ultimately creating more democratic, healthy learning environments where everyone is on the same page. Furthermore, it can all be done with utter CONVENIENCE. In conclusion, every school could benefit from the use of an online network.

Posted in Assessment & Policy, Critical Perspectives, Global Multiliteracy, In the Classroom, Social Networking, Technology, What is Multiliteracy? | Leave a Comment »

ASL Multiliteracies as Critical Perspective

Posted by nicholaspelafas on August 6, 2011

In the Volume 10 No. 2 of the Sign Language Studies (Winter 2010), Kristin Snoddon published an article entitled Technology as a Learning Tool for ASL Literacy.  The article explores “how learning technology was incorporated as part of a study at the Ernest C. Drury School for the Deaf, Milton, Ontario, Canada….which is part of Early and Cummins’s (2002) cross-Canada project, From Literacy to Multiliteracies: Designing Learning Environments for Knowledge Generation within the New Economy.”  The project’s founding objectives were:

1. To explore ways of bringing students’ cultural and linguistic knowledge into the classroom as a foundation for overall literacy development;

2. To explore how technology can enhance students’ engagement with traditional literacy (reading and writing skills) and also pro- mote students’ expertise in “21st-century literacy skills.”

What is interesting about this article, besides demonstrating some of the ways technology was beneficial in the Drury School Study, was Ms. Snoddon’s critical discussion of the relationship between ASL Literacy and Technology. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Critical Perspectives, In the Classroom, Technology, What is Multiliteracy? | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

How To Do Research on Multiliteracies 101

Posted by nicholaspelafas on July 29, 2011

An important part of understanding the ways in which multiliteracies are useful is studying how people utilize them naturally and what they are inspired to do when exposed to them.  As multiliteracy is a relatively new field of study, it is a crucial time to research how multiliteracies are constructed, and to put that into dialogue with how students are taught to utilize them.  It has to do with a number of factors ranging from intuition, attraction, comfort, familiarity, goals, tasking, and inspiration; I have often wondered what a study of the efficacy of newer literacies might look like.

Surfing the web, I came across an awesome 2008 study by Mercedes Sanz Gil and María Luisa Villanueva Alfonso from the Universitat Jaume I in Spain entitled: A Critical Approach to Multiliteracy: Automates Intelligents.  The abstract reads:

In this paper we present and analyse a website with a complex rhyzomatic structure in connection with the results of a cybertask in which students were asked to read various information sources by navigating a range of websites. The results and discussion include issues such as: a) culture of learning and students’ task representation; b) possible relationships between learning styles and ways of navigating and managing information to solve a task; c) criteria students use to evaluate their navigation practices. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Assessment & Policy, Critical Perspectives, Global Multiliteracy, In the Classroom, What is Multiliteracy? | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Multiliteracies and Diversity in Education

Posted by mariamengel on July 11, 2011

“NEW PEDAGOGIES FOR EXPANDING LANDSCAPES”

An excellent resource for teachers beginning to focus on multiliteracy is Multiliteracies and Diversity in Education, edited by Annah Healy.  The text was published in 2007.  The Oxford University Press website offers this description:

Exploring multimodal communication as literacy education from a research platform, Multiliteracies & Diversity in Education combines analyses of the changes to communication and pedagogic practice with sound research based activities for multiliteracies classroom projects. The book guides students in developing their knowledge of productive planning and pedagogic shifts, and reveals ways in which all students are able to engage in designing lesson plans and programmes involving new and traditional methods of reading and text construction. It shows how a multiliteracies pedagogic model breaks down the unnatural divides between disciplines, and provides a fresh look at literacy education.

The chapters are as follows:

1. Expanding student capacities: Learning by Design pedagogy
2. The Transdisciplinary Potential of Multiliteracies: Bodily Performances and Meaning-Making in Health and Physical Education
3. The Intersection of Aboriginal Knowledges, Aboriginal Literacies and New Learning Pedagogy for Aboriginal Students.
4. ‘Art’efacts of Knowing: Multiliteracies and the Arts
5. Multiliteracies and Pedagogies of New Learning for Students of English as an Additional Language
6. Communities of Learners: Early years students, new learning, pedagogy and transformations
7. Closing the gap: A multiliteracies approach to English language teaching for ‘at-risk’ students in Singapore
8. Mobilising Learning: Pedagogy for mobile students

You can read a review of the book by Janet McDowall of the University of South Australia here.

Multiliteracies and Diversity in Education can be purchased on Amazon.

Posted in In the Classroom, Resources, What is Multiliteracy? | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

Multiliteracies Defined

Posted by tricialauter on June 29, 2011

 In 1996, the New London Group presented an article in the Harvard Educational Review detailing a shift in teaching literacy. A Pedagogy of Multiliteracies: Designing Social Futures documents the discussion of leading educational theorists in their attempt to negotiate the rapidly changing social environment of which students and teachers live with the act of teaching literacy. They suggest that teaching literacy must change; be adapted, transformed, to meet the evolving needs of students. Students who are living in a more globalized, connected, and technological world.

The authors argue that literacy instruction must accommodate changing lives: working lives, public lives, and private lives. Literacy instruction must take into account multiple “modes of meaning making” as well as linguistic and cultural diversity. They state that “literacy educators and students must see themselves as active participants in social change, as learners and students who can be active designers-makers-of social futures.”

Thus, this blog is designed to bring together multiple pathways to information-multiple modes of meaning-about multiliteracies and the imminent shift in literacy instruction throughout the world. The current status of this shift will be explored, as well as the implications for teachers and students. Through news articles, videos, academic articles, wikis, pictures, and discussion, we will demonstrate the need for a change in the way that literacy is thought of and taught within the classroom-a multiliteracy revolution.

Posted in What is Multiliteracy? | Leave a Comment »

 
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