multiliteracyrevolution

Archive for the ‘Social Networking’ Category

DIGITALIS – web resource of the National Writing Project

Posted by nicholaspelafas on September 4, 2011

DIGITALIS.nwp.org is a web forum created by the National Writing Project for educators and scholars to “read, discuss, and share ideas about teaching writing today”.  It is a host for a growing number of resources that form “a collection of ideas, reflections, and stories about what it means to teach writing in our digital, interconnected world.”  The format of DIGITAL IS is such that anyone may sign-up and contribute a ‘resource collection’ which represents different postings, lesson plans, articles, and discussion threads around a common general topic.  The democratic, open-source format of the platform also serves to exemplify the way multiliteracies can contribute to building an inclusive and participatory digital civic culture.  This impressive site is making important contributions to the field of multiliteracies and at the same time actively transforming the use of multiliterary  technology in multiliteracy discussions.

The resource collection topics are divided into four general areas: Art/Craft, Teach/Learn, Provocations, and Community.  Provocations are resource collections that deal with critical literacy and perspectives.  I find the resources in this section particularly interesting and have found many pieces that deal with issues we’ve talked about here.   Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted in Critical Perspectives, In the Classroom, Resources, Social Networking, Technology, The Arts | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Web 3.0 Multiliteracies, Decentralized Learning, and other Bits

Posted by nicholaspelafas on August 22, 2011

Thanks for your post on Anonymous and The Contagious Continuum Natty, I think you are right to point out that it is the youth who are utilizing social media most and who also make up a lot of the force behind activist movements like Anonymous.  This shows us that their use of Multiliteracies is empowering and powerful in realms that extend from their educational experience into society at large.  I found an Anonymous related story at the NYTimes technology blog Bits (Business, Innovation, Technology, Society).

The NYTimes Bits blog (bits.blogs.nytimes.com) is a great resource for educators to keep up with technology related topics.  It helps understand some of the practical new technology students are likely to encounter via the marketplace, it highlights innovations in technology and how it’s changing, and it  frames critical issues about the impact of technology on society that can seed important discussions for students.

Recently a couple posts on the blog caught my eye that I though would be pertinent to share here.  The first post I noticed was by Steve Lohr titled ‘A Call To Rethink Internet Search’, and it talked about the future of the internet search and technology being able to understand ‘natural language’.   Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Critical Perspectives, In the Classroom, Resources, Social Networking, Technology | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Insurrections in the UK and Chile, Networked Social Praxis, and Multiliteracies

Posted by nicholaspelafas on August 11, 2011

There is a certain tension hanging precipitously in the air this month, as young people and teenagers, mobilize via facebook, twitter, and their blackberry messengers.  In London and other cities around England, rioters are engaged in seemingly random acts of vandalism, that interestingly coincide with serious downwards slippages in the global economy.  While in many cases there is only pretense of political motivations behind the law-breaking there, at the very least we can understand that there is a dynamic playing here between polarizing socio-economic inequality, perceptions of the irrelevance of the state, collective youth action, and the drives of a capitalist society.  Throw digital technology into the mix, and we have a situation where youth are using the multiliteracies that they didn’t learn how to use in schools, to translate socio-economic-material perceptions, collected via various media outlets, into extended networks of social praxis.

Networked Social Praxis, as I am calling it here, is the way that electronic networks aggregate and distribute information that is in turn combined with individual users’ complex personal experience in such a way that they are inspired to use that information to create new, externalized, and tangible experiences.  The real life events that occur as a result of this decision to mobilize one’s self or group, is then almost immediately fed back into the electronic network via multiliteracies.  As people increasingly access more networked experiences and share their own experiences with others, the more they can realize the scope of that reality which in turn prompts them to get involved.  While perhaps most ramifications of this are still unclear, we can note that the use of multiliteracies by young people in this case encourages expression (what kind?), participatory action (by what means?), and democratic cooperation (to what ends?).

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Posted in Critical Perspectives, Global Multiliteracy, Social Networking, Technology, The Media | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Administration=Education

Posted by serovy1 on August 7, 2011

This is a post is a rant about the connection between administration and the quality of education.It could be argued that administrators “speak their own language in a sense, meaning, each has his or her own way of handling tasks and implementing new strategies for procedures which ultimately direct and dictate a student’s path. What I have come to find as a teacher, however is that administrative staff need to also be open to learning the language of their schools. It is infinitely important that an administrative officer immerse themselves into the culture of the school and try to work as a team along with fellow colleagues, students and staff. If this doesn’t happen, it creates a real distance between everyone. Students don’t get what they need, and teachers become frustrated with the lack of understanding in terms of how documentation and facility strategies form in conjunction with the demands of students and their learning objectives.The bottom line is that in order to solve this problem, everyone needs to communicate. More collaboration between staff means less referrals, more direct answers for students and less objections to new policies,since everyone’s needs would be considered. One way for this to happen is an increase in faculty meetings and discussion, but when daily tasks are so maxed to begin with, that may not always be possible. Thus, the potential for technology to aid in this communication between staff, teachers and students is huge. Online databases and social networking can open portals for schools that would help keep everyone informed, while offering an anonymous, open space for voicing opinions, ultimately creating more democratic, healthy learning environments where everyone is on the same page. Furthermore, it can all be done with utter CONVENIENCE. In conclusion, every school could benefit from the use of an online network.

Posted in Assessment & Policy, Critical Perspectives, Global Multiliteracy, In the Classroom, Social Networking, Technology, What is Multiliteracy? | Leave a Comment »

Facebook, Social Media & Education

Posted by nicholaspelafas on August 2, 2011

Reading the New York Times, I came across a little news blurb about how Facebook was acquiring the e-book publisher Push Pop Press.  Normally, I avoid things having to do with Facebook, but I have been keeping an eye out for multiliteracy related stories, and I had actually already posted about Push Pop Press’s technology last week.

So why would Facebook buy an e-book publisher?  I really appreciated Push Pop’s approach because it came from an educational inspiration, and their first publication really reflected that.  The thought of Facebook diverting these talented software engineers from the education field to the ‘social networking’ field sort of made me sad.  The NYtimes article pushes some theories, but we don’t know the real motivation.

In an effort not to become more of a Facebook-hater than I already am (lol), I decided to do some searching on Facebook and Education.  Clearly, the role of Facebook in delivering multiliteracies to students (for educational purposes or not) is huge, and I was wondering if a) Facebook recognized this and b) what teachers were saying about it.

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The Semantic Web-Man Vs. Machine?

Posted by serovy1 on July 23, 2011

“The Semantic Web is a “web of data” that facilitates machines to understand the semantics, or meaning, of information on the World Wide Web.[1] It extends the network of hyperlinked human-readable web pages by inserting machine-readable metadata about pages and how they are related to each other, enabling automated agents to access the Web more intelligently and perform tasks on behalf of users. The term was coined by Tim Berners-Lee,[2] the inventor of the World Wide Web and director of the World Wide Web Consortium (“W3C”), which oversees the development of proposed Semantic Web standards. He defines the Semantic Web as “a web of data that can be processed directly and indirectly by machines.”- Wikipedia

The concept of the symantic web is SCARY, and confusing, but exciting. This new technology takes things a step further, and allows for the computer to recognize not only key words but also the relationship between data on the web. This has wonderful potential to help people in thier research and in building meanings from one another, because it will automatically filter a search more specifically to the material you are looking for. As explained above in the video and in the definition, the semantic web is not an emerging but actually a current technology that developers are actively working on. With the obvious benefits being stated, one can help but also wonder what other outcomes may arise as computers become more like mind reading research assitants and less like machines that we manipulate.

The symantic web seems like it could perpetuate a spirit of laziness that would enable people to remain within more confined realms of information based on the connectins they already have (although the opposite is also true). In all honesty, I’m still trying to process it all, but the idea that a machine can understand me is a bit jarring. Am I thinking faster than my computer,or is it thinking faster than me, and if so, how will this progressively more intelligent symantic web dictate my decisions even further. Have you ever been on facebook tagging photos, and the computer already seems to recognize the faces of your beloved family members and friends before you even type in their names. It Knows who I hang out with!!! I already feel exposed and like other people can find out anything they want about me with the click of the mouse. Now do I have to worry about a computer “knowing” everything too? Is it going to control my mind? This is SCIFI stuff indeed.

Posted in Assessment & Policy, Critical Perspectives, Global Multiliteracy, In the Classroom, Social Networking, Technology | Leave a Comment »

OSI discussion: The Impact of the Internet on Democratic Culture, Institutions, and Engagement

Posted by nicholaspelafas on July 19, 2011

Over at the Open Society Institute, I found an interesting discussion entitled Through A Web Darkly: Does the internet spread Democracy or Ignorance?.  It deals with the melding landscapes of technology, information and government control.  I would recommend listening to it as it touches on some key issues being discussed in technology circles, but in terms of multi-literacy I think it really gives us some important things to think about.

One of the themes that arose on a couple of occasions was that of the ‘fragmentation of media platforms and experiences and their relationships to media literacy.’  Similarly, another panel member’s states that there are now different (yet specific) types of intermediaries for organizing information and directing attention.  What we are seeing then is that being literate is taking on an increasing number of forms and that the way we interact with these new literacies is determined in a growing number of ways.  In some cases, the way we adapt to these new literacies is determined by very specific key players, namely Google and Facebook (among others let influential ones).

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Africa 2.0 & African Literacies

Posted by nicholaspelafas on July 16, 2011

In an article titled ‘Africa 2.0: Myth or Reality’ from Pambazuka News (www.pambazuka.org) the author brings together various perspectives on the role of technology in Africa at a moment when discussing its potential has become popular.  While the concerns of the various contributors are quite diverse, some important points are made that can help us to think critically about multiliteracy in a global context.  One author writes:

“In many contexts, new media does not have the same pervasiveness or reach as mediums such as newspapers, radios and mobile phones. At the local level, the tools required for change are often already in people’s hands; the challenge is making them work effectively to meet the needs of the context.”

This means that it may not be necessary for African or other non-Euroamerican countries to pursue the proliferation of new media in same way as the West, and that if we are focusing on setting priorities for improving quality of life via cooperation and communication, perhaps we should not valorize new western literacy technologies before we consider the potentials of existing technologies and literacies.  This is further complicated by existing realities on the continent, as pointed out by another contributor:

‘The literacy divide. I’ve blogged here before about the fact that slowly growing rates of literacy and rapidly growing rates of mobile internet access might mean that inability to read, rather than lack of access to the technology, will soon become the key barrier to accessing the internet. There are lots of great examples of how mobile communications can be used to promote literacy, but the point still stands. And again, it’s largely up to governments to make sure that literacy expands fast enough to keep up.”

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Social Networking as a holistic example of multiliteracies

Posted by rlwalte2 on July 7, 2011

#socialnetworkingasaholisticexample
Twitter, facebook, linkedin, myspace, Flickr; what do they all have in common?  They are all social networking sites that provide perfect examples to the question ‘what does multileracies look like?’  They all provide capabilities to incorporate sound, images, and text along with movies, video clips, audio bites, and photographs into a unique melange.

In our ever-evolving technologically savvy world, examples of the complex intertwining of various components can be seen in various sources of media, from television to automatic billboards.  One notable example of the way in which humans are experiencing multiliteracies can be taken from the sitcom, ‘How I Met Your Mother’.  The television show often purchases Internet domain names to create inside jokes among the characters.
Each time an episode with one of these particular sites mentioned, the site goes viral and receives hundreds of thousands of viewers to the page. [http://www.businessinsider.com/how-i-met-your-mothers-website-success-2009-3]

The fact that television shows can incorporate websites into their story lines that are then accessed by so many viewers (tied into their laptop computers while watching said program) simultaneously that sites crash,  proves how valuable multiliteracies can be.

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